2016 — 2017 Events

September 8, 2016 Two Voices Salon with translator Bela Shayevich on Nobel Prize winner Svetlana Alexievich

We welcome translator Bela Shayevich to discuss her translation of the new work by 2015 Nobel laureate Svetlana Alexievich. Secondhand Time is a look at the generation that saw the end of Communism and the first post-Soviet generation in Russia and former USSR states.

Senior Editor Scott Esposito will talk with Shayevich about the challenges presented by Alexievich’s unique style, which consists almost entirely of interviews she conducts with ordinary people. We’ll also delve into Alexievich’s groundbreaking career and what her observations of Russia during and after Communism tell us about that country and where it is headed.

As always, snacks and beverages will be provided. And if you’ve read Alexievich or have insights about Russia, be ready to jump on in and participate in the conversation.

  • September 8, 2016
  • Center for the Art of Translation office
  • 582 Market St., (at Montgomery), Suite 700, San Francisco
  • Doors open at 5:30, event begins at 6:00
  • FREE food and drinks
September 12, 2016 Book release party for Gustave Flaubert's "Bouvard and Pécuchet"

We're delighted to co-sponsor a celebration of a new limited edition of Gustave Flaubert's Bouvard and Pécuchet, from San Francisco's celebrated Arion Press. Featuring a talk by translator Mark Polizzotti and a chance to see the book, this is an event for lovers of translation and fine bookmaking alike.

Mark Polizzotti is an award-winning translator and the biographer of André Breton. He is editor-in-chief of the book publishing program at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. His translation of Nobel Prize-winner Patrick Modiano’s The Black Notebooks will be published in September.

  • September 12, 2016
  • Arion Press
  • 1802 Hays Street, The Presidio, San Francisco (map)
  • Reception at 5:00 pm, event begins at 6:00
  • FREE, but RSVP to 415 668 2542 or email
September 20, 2016 Poetry Into the Beyond: Yoshimasu Gozo and Forrest Gander at SF Camerawork

“Gozo Yoshimasu is, simply put, one of a handful of the most important and influential living poets whose work has taken poetry into the beyond.”    -Forrest Gander

The Center for the Art of Translation welcomes Japanese poet and performance artist Yoshimasu Gozo and poet Forrest Gander to San Francisco for a performance and discussion of Gozo’s work, including upcoming poetry collection Alice Iris Red Horse (New Directions). Edited by Gander, Alice Iris Red Horse gathers translations of Gozo’s major works that span his entire career. Also included are illuminating interviews and reproductions of Gozo’s artwork and performances.

Please join us for an evening with this acclaimed Japanese poet, photographer, performance artist, and filmmaker.

  • September 20, 2016
  • SF Camerawork
  • 1011 Market St, San Francisco
  • Doors at 7:00 pm. Performance at 7:30 pm.
  • FREE

Yoshimasu Gozo, born in Tokyo, has performed worldwide. His work has been described as “so unorthodox that it defies the print medium and can be delivered only as performance.” He has received many literary and cultural awards, including the Takami Jun Prize, the Rekitei Prize, the Purple Ribbon, and the 50th Mainichi Art Award for Poetry.

Forrest Gander is the author of numerous books of poetry, fiction, translation, and essays. He has won the Whiting Writers’ Award, a Howard Foundation Award, the Jessica Nobel Maxwell Memorial Prize, two Gertrude Stein Awards for innovative North American writing, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, and United States Artists. His 2011 collection Core Samples from the World was an NBCC and Pulitzer Prize finalist for poetry. He has taught at Harvard and Brown.

Alice Iris Red Horse, edited by Forrest Gander with introduction and notes by Derek Gromadski, features translations from the Japanese by Sawako Nakayasu, Hiroaki Sato, Eric Selland, Jeffrey Angles, Richard Arno, Derek Gromadzki, Forrest Gander, Sayuri Okamoto, Auston Stewart, and Kyoko Yoshida.

October 5, 2016 A Spare Life author tour with Lidija Dimkovska kicks off in Brooklyn

"Dimkovska has an eye for detail befitting a poet and the stark, unrelenting prose of a master storyteller." --Sara Novic, author of Girl At War, Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist


We're kicking off an unprecedented 10-city tour with A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska at Brooklyn's Community Bookstore!

Dimkovska will speak with author and translator Katie Kitamura and read from the book.

The first book from this award-winning Macedonian poet and author to appear in English (translated by Christina Kramer), A Spare Life tells the story of a set of conjoined twins' emergence from girls to young adults in the former Yugoslavia, from their desperately poor, provincial childhoods to their determination to become successful, independent women. After years of discovery and friendship, their lives are thrown into crisis when an incident threatens to destroy their bond as sisters. They fly to London, determined to be surgically separated—but will this dangerous procedure free them, or only more tightly ensnare them?

Lidija Dimkovska is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2013 European Union Prize for Literature for A Spare Life. She is also the author of the poetry collection pH Neutral History, which was a finalist for the 2013 Best Translated Book Award, and Do Not Awaken Them With Hammers. She lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Katie Kitamura is a critic and novelist living in New York City. She is the author of Gone to the Forest and The Longshot, both of which were finalists for the New York Public Library's Young Lions Fiction Award. A recipient of a Lannan Residency Fellowship, Kitamura has written for The New York TimesThe GuardianGrantaBOMBTriple Canopy, and is a regular contributor to Frieze. Her new novel, A Separation, is forthcoming from Riverhead Books in February 2017.

October 6, 2016 ALTA Conference Opening Night Party

We help kick off the 39th annual American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) Conference with an Opening Night reception at Parliament, in Oakland's historic district. We're delighted to welcome translators and publishers from around the country and celebrate their amazing work.

Join us for food, drinks, readings, and catch up with your colleagues!

More details to come.

  • October 6, 2016
  • Parliament
  • 811 Washington St., Oakland (map)
  • 5:00-7:00 pm
  • FREE
October 7, 2016 A Spare Life author tour continues with Lidija Dimkovska in Baltimore

Don't miss the 10-city tour with A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska, in Baltimore on October 7!

The first book from this award-winning Macedonian poet and author to appear in English (translated by Christina Kramer), A Spare Life tells the story of a set of conjoined twins' emergence from girls to young adults in the former Yugoslavia, from their desperately poor, provincial childhoods to their determination to become successful, independent women. After years of discovery and friendship, their lives are thrown into crisis when an incident threatens to destroy their bond as sisters. They fly to London, determined to be surgically separated—but will this dangerous procedure free them, or only more tightly ensnare them?

Lidija Dimkovska is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2013 European Union Prize for Literature for A Spare Life. She is also the author of the poetry collection pH Neutral History, which was a finalist for the 2013 Best Translated Book Award, and Do Not Awaken Them With Hammers. She lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

October 12, 2016 A Celebration of Julio Cortázar

As part of our ongoing partnership with the annual Litquake literary festival and City Lights Books, the Center is delighted to be hosting a celebration of Julio Cortázar with our favorite Bay Area translators.

Join Stephen Kessler, translator of the forthcoming Save Twilight, Lewis Buzbee, Mauro Javier Cardenas, Pola Oloixarac, Silvia Oviedo-López, and Katherine Silver for a reading of their favorite works from Cortázar. 

Julio Cortázar was an Argentine novelist and short story writer best known as one of the founders of the "Boom" of Latin American fiction in the 1960s, which continues to influence Spanish-speaking writers. While living in Paris during the last months of his life, Cortázar assembled his life's work in verse for publication, and Save Twilight selects the best of that volume, making these poems available in English for the very first time.

Stephen Kessler is a poet, prose writer, translator, and editor. His award-winning translations of the Spanish poet Luis Cernuda include Forbidden Pleasures, Desolation of the Chimera, and Written in Water.  He is also the editor and principal translator of The Sonnets by Jorge Luis Borges. From 1999 through 2014 he was the editor of The Redwood Coast Review, four-time winner of the California Library Association's PR Excellence Award. His most recent books of original writing include Where Was I? (prose poems), Need I Say More? (essays), Scratch Pegasus (poems), and The Mental Traveler (novel). He lives in Santa Cruz, where his op-ed columns appear regularly in the Santa Cruz Sentinel.

Lewis Buzbee is the author of The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop, Blackboard, Steinbeck's Ghost, The Haunting of Charles Dickens, and Bridge of Time.

Mauro Javier Cardenas is the author of The Revolutionaries Try Again (Coffee House Press, September 2016). His fiction has appeared in Conjunctions, The Antioch Review, Guernica, Witness, ZYZZYVA and BOMB. He's the recipient of the 2016 Joseph Henry Jackson Award.

Pola Oloixarac is an Argentine writer and translator. Her first novel, Las teorias salvajes (Savage Theories), was published in 2008. In 2010 she won a literary award from Argentina's Fondo Nacional de las Artes and is currently in residence at the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa. She has a philosophy degree from the University of Buenos Aires and has written on culture and technology for various magazines.

Silvia Oviedo-López is a Spanish poet and translator based in San Francisco. Her work has appeared in different anthologies and journals on both sides of the Atlantic. She is the founder of Desbandada, a journal of original and translated poetry.

Katherine Silver’s translation of Literature Classes, by Julio Cortázar, will be published by New Directions in 2017. Her most recent translations include works by Martín Adán, Daniel Sada, Horacio Castellanos Moya, César Aira, and Jorge Luis Borges. She is currently translating the work of Juan Carlos Onetti and Julio Ramón Ribeyro.

October 12, 2016 A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska in Asheville, NC

“Transcendent, dizzying, and not to be missed.”--Boston Review


Don't miss the 10-city tour with A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska, in Asheville, North Carolina on October 12!

The first book from this award-winning Macedonian poet and author to appear in English (translated by Christina Kramer), A Spare Life tells the story of a set of conjoined twins' emergence from girls to young adults in the former Yugoslavia, from their desperately poor, provincial childhoods to their determination to become successful, independent women. After years of discovery and friendship, their lives are thrown into crisis when an incident threatens to destroy their bond as sisters. They fly to London, determined to be surgically separated—but will this dangerous procedure free them, or only more tightly ensnare them?

Lidija Dimkovska is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2013 European Union Prize for Literature for A Spare Life. She is also the author of the poetry collection pH Neutral History, which was a finalist for the 2013 Best Translated Book Award, and Do Not Awaken Them With Hammers. She lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

October 13, 2016 A Spare Life author tour: Lidija Dimkovska in Iowa City

“Transcendent, dizzying, and not to be missed.”--Boston Review


Don't miss the 10-city tour with A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska, in Iowa City, Iowa on October 13!

The first book from this award-winning Macedonian poet and author to appear in English (translated by Christina Kramer), A Spare Life tells the story of a set of conjoined twins' emergence from girls to young adults in the former Yugoslavia, from their desperately poor, provincial childhoods to their determination to become successful, independent women. After years of discovery and friendship, their lives are thrown into crisis when an incident threatens to destroy their bond as sisters. They fly to London, determined to be surgically separated—but will this dangerous procedure free them, or only more tightly ensnare them?

Lidija Dimkovska is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2013 European Union Prize for Literature for A Spare Life. She is also the author of the poetry collection pH Neutral History, which was a finalist for the 2013 Best Translated Book Award, and Do Not Awaken Them With Hammers. She lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

October 14, 2016 A Spare Life author tour with Lidija Dimkovska in Chicago

“Transcendent, dizzying, and not to be missed.”--Boston Review


Don't miss the 10-city tour with A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska, in Chicago on October 14! Dimkovska with talk with South Slavic and Balkan Literatures expert Angelina Ilieva and read from the book.

The first book from this award-winning Macedonian poet and author to appear in English (translated by Christina Kramer), A Spare Life tells the story of a set of conjoined twins' emergence from girls to young adults in the former Yugoslavia, from their desperately poor, provincial childhoods to their determination to become successful, independent women. After years of discovery and friendship, their lives are thrown into crisis when an incident threatens to destroy their bond as sisters. They fly to London, determined to be surgically separated—but will this dangerous procedure free them, or only more tightly ensnare them?

Lidija Dimkovska is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2013 European Union Prize for Literature for A Spare Life. She is also the author of the poetry collection pH Neutral History, which was a finalist for the 2013 Best Translated Book Award, and Do Not Awaken Them With Hammers. She lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Angelina Ilieva is a lecturer in South Slavic and Balkan Literatures at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literature at the University of Chicago, where she teaches classes on literature, culture, and identities in South Eastern Europe. Her main focus is on the relation between narration and identities.

October 15, 2016 A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska in Minneapolis/St. Paul

Join us at this year's Twin Cities Book Festival and meet A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska on October 15. As part of "The Personal and the Political" reading, Dimkovska will be joined by Karan Mahajan and Derek Palacio as they discuss how their characters navigate their personal struggles amidst the turmoil of their homelands.

Presented in cooperation with Rain Taxi

photo credit Jennifer Simonson

October 18, 2016 A Spare Life author Lidijia Dimkovska in Seattle

“Transcendent, dizzying, and not to be missed.”--Boston Review


Don't miss the 10-city tour with A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska, in Seattle on October 18!

The first book from this award-winning Macedonian poet and author to appear in English (translated by Christina Kramer), A Spare Life tells the story of a set of conjoined twins' emergence from girls to young adults in the former Yugoslavia, from their desperately poor, provincial childhoods to their determination to become successful, independent women. After years of discovery and friendship, their lives are thrown into crisis when an incident threatens to destroy their bond as sisters. They fly to London, determined to be surgically separated—but will this dangerous procedure free them, or only more tightly ensnare them?

Lidija Dimkovska is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2013 European Union Prize for Literature for A Spare Life. She is also the author of the poetry collection pH Neutral History, which was a finalist for the 2013 Best Translated Book Award, and Do Not Awaken Them With Hammers. She lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

October 19, 2016 A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska first of 2 Bay Area events

We're wrapping up our 10-city tour with two Bay Area events with A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska!

Dimkovska will talk with Two Lines Senior Editor Scott Esposito about the novel and read from the book.

The first book from this award-winning Macedonian poet and author to appear in English (translated by Christina Kramer), A Spare Life tells the story of a set of conjoined twins' emergence from girls to young adults in the former Yugoslavia, from their desperately poor, provincial childhoods to their determination to become successful, independent women. After years of discovery and friendship, their lives are thrown into crisis when an incident threatens to destroy their bond as sisters. They fly to London, determined to be surgically separated—but will this dangerous procedure free them, or only more tightly ensnare them?

Lidija Dimkovska is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2013 European Union Prize for Literature for A Spare Life. She is also the author of the poetry collection pH Neutral History, which was a finalist for the 2013 Best Translated Book Award, and Do Not Awaken Them With Hammers. She lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

October 20, 2016 Final Bay Area event with A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska

We're wrapping up our 10-city tour with two Bay Area events with A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska!

Dimkovska will talk about the novel and read from the book.

The first book from this award-winning Macedonian poet and author to appear in English (translated by Christina Kramer), A Spare Life tells the story of a set of conjoined twins' emergence from girls to young adults in the former Yugoslavia, from their desperately poor, provincial childhoods to their determination to become successful, independent women. After years of discovery and friendship, their lives are thrown into crisis when an incident threatens to destroy their bond as sisters. They fly to London, determined to be surgically separated—but will this dangerous procedure free them, or only more tightly ensnare them?

Lidija Dimkovska is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2013 European Union Prize for Literature for A Spare Life. She is also the author of the poetry collection pH Neutral History, which was a finalist for the 2013 Best Translated Book Award, and Do Not Awaken Them With Hammers. She lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

October 21, 2016 Final author tour event! Lidija Dimkovska in Los Angeles

“Transcendent, dizzying, and not to be missed.”--Boston Review


The final stop on our 10-city tour with A Spare Life author Lidija Dimkovska, in Los Angeles on October 21!

The first book from this award-winning Macedonian poet and author to appear in English (translated by Christina Kramer), A Spare Life tells the story of a set of conjoined twins' emergence from girls to young adults in the former Yugoslavia, from their desperately poor, provincial childhoods to their determination to become successful, independent women. After years of discovery and friendship, their lives are thrown into crisis when an incident threatens to destroy their bond as sisters. They fly to London, determined to be surgically separated—but will this dangerous procedure free them, or only more tightly ensnare them?

  • October 21, 2016
  • Skylight Books
  • 1818 North Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, CA
  • 7:30 pm
  • FREE

Lidija Dimkovska is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2013 European Union Prize for Literature for A Spare Life. She is also the author of the poetry collection pH Neutral History, which was a finalist for the 2013 Best Translated Book Award, and Do Not Awaken Them With Hammers. She lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

October 29, 2016 Reading and discussion of Arno Schmidt's "Bottom's Dream"

"Reading Arno Schmidt can be addictive" --Times Literary Supplement

A discussion with Volker Langbehn, Professor of German at San Francisco State University, about the new release of German author Arno Schmidt's Bottom's Dream, translated by John E.  Woods. The book has been called "the German Finnegan's Wake", and weighs in at a staggering 1500 pages. Since its publication in 1970, the book has been regarded as Arno Schimdt’s magnum opus, the definitive work of a titan of postwar German literature.

Join us for a reading and conversation about the book!

John E. Woods is a German translator living in Berlin who has translated several books by Arno Schmidt as well as contemporary authors Ingo Schulze and Christoph Ransmyr. He has also translated all of the major works by Thomas Mann.

Volker Langbehn is a professor of German at San Francisco State University and an expert in 18th-20th century German language and literature.

November 10, 2016 Two Voices Salon with translator Donald Nicholson-Smith

Join us at a special Two Voices Salon to celebrate the release of prize-winning Moroccan poet Abdellatif Laabi's latest book, In Praise of Defeat, translated from the French by Donald Nicholson-Smith.

Donald Nicholson-Smith is a translator and editor focused on psychology and social criticism, more recently moving to fiction--especially noir fiction--and poetry. He has received numerous awards and was short-listed for the French-American Prize for his translation of Apollinaire's Letters to Madeleine; and has also been named a Chevalier des Arts et Lettres for services to French literature in translation.

Abdellatif Laabi is a novelist, poet and playwright, and the French translator of Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish, the Moroccan poet Abdallah Zrika, the Iraqi poet Abdelawahab Al Bayati and the Syrian novelist Hanna Minna. He has edited numerous anthologies, most notably one of twentieth-century Moroccan poetry. He received the Prix Goncourt de la Poésie in 2009 and the Académie française's Grand prix de la Francophonie in 2011.

Snacks and beverages provided, please come join the conversation!

  • November 10, 2016
  • Center for the Art of Translation office
  • 582 Market St. (at Montgomery), Suite 700, San Francisco
  • Doors open at 5:30, event starts at 6:00
  • FREE
December 8, 2016 Two Voices Salon with translator Chris Andrews on César Aira

Chris Andrews joins us to talk about his newest translation, Ema, the Captive, from the prolific Argentine writer César Aira.

Chris Andrews is a translator and professor at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. He has translated numerous books by César Aira and Chilean writer Roberto Bolaño, as well as a critical study of poetry and science and a collection of poems.

César Aira is an Argentine author and translator who has written more than 80 novels and translated and edited works from multiple languages. Aira also writes regularly for the Spanish newspaper El País. In 1996 he received a Guggenheim scholarship, and was a finalist for the 2015 Man Booker International Prize.

Snacks and beverages provided, please join us for the final Salon of 2016!

  • December 8, 2016
  • Center for the Art of Translation office
  • 582 Market St. (at Montgomery), Suite 700, San Francisco
  • Doors open at 5:30, event starts at 6:00
  • FREE
March 9, 2017 A Night of Literature in Translation with Two Lines

Join us for an evening of literature at Amado's, in the Mission District in San Francisco!

The night will include music, conversation, and live readings from Issues 25 and 26. We'll provide snacks and drinks. You'll also get a chance to meet Two Lines staff and hear more about upcoming issues of the journal, and grab a sneak peek at our forthcoming book.

All proceeds support Two Lines Press. Your $10/$15 ticket includes a free issue of the journal. Check back for ticket purchase details.

  • Thursday, March 9, 2017
  • Amado's
  • 998 Valencia St. (at 21st), San Francisco
  • $10/$15, buy tickets
  • 7:00 pm
March 23, 2017 Two Voices Salon with Open Letter Books' Chad Post

We'll talk with publisher Chad Post about the latest book in translation from Chinese writer Can Xue, which Flavorwire calls "one of the most raved-about works of translated fiction this year.”

Can Xue is the pseudonym of Chinese writer Deng Xiaohoa, who is the author of six novels and numerous novellas and short stories, as well as several commentaries. Born in 1953 to a family that suffered persecution in anti-rightist campaigns and the Cultural Revolution, she began writing in 1983 and has become known for her abstract style and unconventional narrative form.

Chad Post is the publisher of Open Letter Books, a non-profit literary translation press based at the University of Rochester. He also oversees the annual Best Translated Book Awards. Open Letter will publish Can Xue's Frontier in March 2017.

As always, we'll discuss the latest translation and publishing news and what we're reading now. Come prepared to join the conversation!

  • Thursday, March 23, 2017
  • Center for the Art of Translation office
  • 582 Market St., (at Post), Suite 700, San Francisco
  • Doors open at 5:30, event begins at 6:00
  • FREE food and drinks